All Known Pardons By Donald J. Trump during his Tenure as President

President Trump is now a citizen. Before leaving, he administered at least 150 + pardons to people that did not deserve a pardon, but many did deserve a pardon. One that sticks out is Steve Bannon. Mr. Bannon was indicted and never reached trial. But now since he received a full pardon from the Trump, he doesn’t have to go to court on any Federal charges against him. That doesn’t excuse Bannon from having to testify if he is called about others. “If the witness has already received a pardon, he cannot longer set up his privilege of the fifth amendment, since he stands with respect to such an offense as if it had never been committed.” He or she must testify or face contempt from court. He can then incriminate himself but not be charged, but anyone else he talks about can face prosecution. If it is proven that he lies about his statements in another trial about someone else, then he is liable and faces prosecution for lying in court.

Others that received a last minute pardon from President Donald J. Trump…

With only hours to go before leaving office, President Donald Trump pardoned 74 people and commuted the sentences of 70 others.

A list of 143 people, made public early Wednesday morning, included his former chief strategist and longtime ally Steve Bannon as well as his former top fundraiser Elliott Broidy. Then, with less than an hour to go before President-elect Joe Biden was set to be sworn in, Trump granted one last pardon: to Albert J. Pirro, Jr., the ex-husband of Fox News host and longtime ally Jeanine Pirro. Most names highlighted in red have something directly to do with Donald Trump, most likely to cover-up Trump offenses.

Here are some of the most notable names:

Alex Adjmi: Adjmi was granted a full pardon. The White House said Adjmi was convicted of a financial crime in 1996 and served 5 years in prison.

Fred Keith Alford: Alford received a full pardon. The White House said he was convicted in 1977 for a firearm violation and served one year’s unsupervised probation.

Michael Ashley: Ashley was convicted for bank fraud over the 2009 collapse of mortgage company Lend America and sentenced to 3 years in prison in 2019. He was the executive vice president and chief business strategist with the company. Ashley was ordered to pay $49 million in restitution and $800,000 in forfeiture. His sentence was commuted.

Stephen K. Bannon: Trump’s former chief strategist in the White House was in charge of the final months of his 2016 presidential campaign and was indicted in August along with three others on wire fraud and money laundering conspiracy charges. Prosecutors alleged that Bannon’s crowdfunding “We Build the Wall” campaign raised more than $25 million from Trump supporters and used hundreds of thousands for personal expenses. He was taken into custody by U.S. Postal Inspection Service agents while on board the yacht of Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui. Bannon received a full pardon and now will not have to face a trial.

Lynn Barney: Trump granted a full pardon to Lynn Barney, who was sentenced to 35 months in prison for possessing a firearm as a previously convicted felon, after having previously been convicted for distributing a small amount of marijuana, according to the White House.

David Barren: Trump commuted the sentence of David Barren, who was sentenced to life in prison in addition to 20 years for a drug conspiracy charge. In 2017, President Barack Obama commuted his life term to a 30-year sentence. The White House said Barren is a father of six children and has maintained an exemplary prison record. A petition advocating for further clemency for Barren’s release has garnered nearly 20,000 signatures.

Dr. Faustino Bernadett: Bernadett, a retired anesthesiologist, was sentenced last year to 15 months in federal prison for taking part in a long-running health care fraud scheme where he authorized sham contracts that concealed over $30 million in illegal kickback payments to physicians, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. The overall scheme resulted in more than $900 million in fraudulent bills being submitted, the office said. The White House said Bernadett has spent the past year “devoted to helping protect his community from Covid-19.” He received a full pardon.

Carl Andrews Boggs: Trump granted a full pardon to Carl Andrews Boggs. In 2014, Boggs pleaded guilty to federal charges stemming from a criminal investigation into the illegal use of a disadvantaged business enterprise to obtain government-funded construction contracts. According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, he pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the department of transportation and one count of money laundering conspiracy.

Kristina Bohnenkamp: Trump commuted the sentence of Kristina Bohnenkamp. According to the White House, she has served more than 10 years of a 24-year sentence for a non-violent drug offense.

Todd Boulanger: Trump granted a full pardon to Todd Boulanger, who is a former deputy to disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff. In 2009, he pleaded guilty to conspiring with others to commit honest services fraud, according to the Department of Justice. Boulanger, Abramoff and other lobbyists working with them sought to advance the interests of groups and companies they represented by lobbying federal legislative and executive branch officials, the department said.

Jonathon Braun: Braun imported marijuana worth approximately $1.76 billion, from 2008 to 2010, according to Customs and Border Protection documents, including 2,200 pounds in a single incident. He pleaded guilty in 2011 and served five years of a 10-year sentence for conspiracy to import marijuana and to commit money laundering. Trump commuted his sentence.

Elliott Broidy: Broidy, a former Republican National Committee finance chair and one of Trump’s top fundraisers, was pardoned. Broidy pleaded guilty in October to conspiring to violate foreign lobbying laws. Prosecutors said that the scheme aimed to have the Trump administration sink an investigation into the multibillion-dollar looting of a Malaysian state investment fund.

Dwayne Michael Carter Jr.: Carter, a rapper who performs as Lil Wayne, was also granted a pardon. He pleaded guilty in December to a federal weapons charge after he carried a handgun from California to Florida on his private jet. Due to past felony convictions, he is barred under federal law from possessing firearms. The charge carries a maximum prison sentence of 10 years. Carter has frequently expressed support for Trump and recently met with the president on criminal justice issues.

Randall “Duke” Cunningham: Another ex-member of Congress, the California Republican was sentenced to 8 years in prison for bribery and was released in 2013. He received a conditional pardon.

Paul Erickson: Erickson, a conservative operative with ties to the NRA, came under scrutiny during the investigation into Russian election interference. He pleaded guilty to wire fraud and money laundering in an unrelated case.

Rodney Nakia Gibson: Convicted of drug trafficking in 2009, Gibson served more than 11 years in custody, according to the White House. His commutation was supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. The details of his conviction couldn’t be independently verified.

George Gilmore: This former local GOP chairman was convicted in April 2019 of failing to pay payroll taxes and for making false statements on a bank loan application. In an appeal, Gilmore claimed that a “hoarding” disorder made him spend lavishly on personal expenses rather than make timely payments to the IRS. His pardon was supported by former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie among others.

Deborah, Gregory and Martin Jorgensen: In the 1980s, the Jorgensens marketed and sold processed beef as heart-healthy, antibiotic-free and hormone-free. When demand outstripped their supply of beef, they mixed in commercial beef trim that usually used to make hamburgers, without telling their customers. They were convicted in 1996 of several counts, including conspiracy and fraudulent sale of misbranded meat. Martin Jorgensen passed away in 2019, and was married to Deborah Jorgensen. Gregory Jorgensen is their son.

Bill K. Kapri: Kodak Black, whose legal name is Bill Kapri, was sentenced to 46 months in prison on federal weapons charges in 2019 after admitting that he falsified information on federal forms to buy four firearms. The rapper obtained three guns: a 9mm handgun, a .380-caliber handgun and a semi-automatic Mini Draco weapon. He received a pardon.

Kwame Kilpatrick: The former mayor of Detroit had his 28-year sentence commuted. He pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice and resigned from office as part of a plea deal in 2008 following a pay-to-play scheme in which Kilpatrick and his father took kickbacks and bribes to steer city business to certain contractors. He initially served 99 days in prison but then served an additional year for violating his probation and was released in 2011.

Kenneth Kurson: Trump granted clemency to Kurson, the former editor of the New York Observer and friend of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner who was charged last October with cyberstalking during a heated divorce.

Anthony Levandowski: Levandowski, a former Google engineer who was sentenced for stealing a trade secret on self-driving cars months before he briefly headed Uber Technologies Inc’s rival unit, was also pardoned.

Salomon Melgen: Trump commuted the prison sentence of Melgen, an eye doctor and major Democratic donor convicted of defrauding Medicare patients. He stood trial with New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, who lobbied Trump for Melgen’s case.

Desiree Perez: Perez was arrested in 1994 for drug possession and in 1998 for grand larceny and possession of a firearm. In 2019, she was named CEO of Roc Nation, the entertainment company founded by rapper-turned-mogul Jay-Z.

Albert J. Pirro, Jr.: With less than an hour to go before Biden is sworn in, Trump granted a full pardon to Albert J. Pirro, Jr. Pirro, Jr., the ex-husband of Fox News host and Trump ally Jeanine Pirro, was convicted on conspiracy and tax evasion charges in 2000.

Rick Renzi: Former U.S. Rep. Rick Renzi, R-Ariz., was granted a full pardon. In 2013, he was sentenced to three years in prison for extortion, bribery, insurance fraud, money laundering and racketeering in a public corruption case. He had served three terms in the House.

Aviem Sella: An Israeli citizen, Sella was indicted in March 1987 on charges he recruited convicted American spy Jonathan Jay Pollard to collect U.S. military secrets for Israel. Trump granted him a full pardon and his request was supported by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli ambassador to the U.S. and the U.S. ambassador to Israel.

Brian Simmons: Trump commuted the sentence of Brian Simmons, who has served 5 years of a 15-year sentence for nonviolent conspiracy to manufacture and distribute marijuana.

Syrita Steib-Martin: Syrita Steib of New Orleans, received a full pardon after being convicted at the age of 19 of using fire to commit a felony. Steib now serves as executive director and co-founder of Operation Restoration, which works to create education and work opportunities for formerly incarcerated women.

Patrick Lee Swisher: Patrick Swisher of Charlotte, North Carolina, was granted a full pardon after being convicted in 2002 of tax fraud and false statements and serving 18 months in prison. Previous to this, the Securities and Exchange Commission had charged his company with accounting fraud in 2001. Swisher now works as CEO of a company at which he employs more than 1,000 individuals, according to the White House.

David Tamman: Trump granted a full pardon to David Tamman, who was a partner at a law firm when he doctored financial documents at the behest of a client who was perpetrating a Ponzi scheme. According to the Department of Justice, the scheme ultimately took $22 million from victims. Tamman was found guilty of 10 counts that included obstruction of justice, altering records in a federal investigation, and being an accessory after the fact to the fraud scheme. He was convicted in 2013 and completed his seven-year sentence in 2019.

Casey Urlacher: Urlacher was pardoned after being named in a grand jury indictment in 2020 and being accused of helping to run an illegal offshore gambling business. Urlacher faced two counts in the case, each of which had carried a potential prison sentence of five years. He currently serves as the mayor of Mettawa, Illinois and is the brother of former Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher.

Monstsho Eugene Vernon: Vernon had his sentence commuted after serving 19 years in prison. Vernon committed numerous armed bank robberies in Greenville, South Carolina. The White House said that some of these offenses involved Vernon carrying BB guns as opposed to genuine firearms.

Blanca Virgen: Blanca Virgen was convicted of drug charges, and has served 12 years of a 30-year sentence. Virgen featured on the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers trial penalty clemency project which described her as “a model prisoner” and highlighted her desire to return to Mexico to care for her children.

Jerry Donnell Walden: Convicted in 1998 of conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, Walden was sentenced to 40 years in prison. President Trump has commuted Walden’s sentence, 23 years into his incarceration.

John Harold Wall: Wall was granted a full pardon after being convicted of aiding and abetting possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine in 1992. According to the White House, he completed a 60 month prison sentence with 4 years’ supervised release.

William Walters: A retired professional gambler, Las Vegas-based William Walters had been sentenced to prison for five years in 2017 for conspiring to commit insider trading from at least 2008 through 2014. Walters, who was 70 at the time of his conviction, was also ordered to pay a $10 million fine. Trump’s commutation of the sentence was supported by former Majority Leader Harry Reid and golfer Phil Mickelson, among others. The New York Times reported that this pardon was brokered by John Dowd, Trump’s former personal lawyer, who was hired by Walters to exert his influence on Trump

Eliyahu Weinstein: Weinstein, from Lakewood, New Jersey, has been pardoned whilst serving his eighth year of a 24-year sentence for a real estate investment fraud as well as money laundering charges. His commutation was supported by former U.S. Attorney Brett Tolman, former Representative Bob Barr, and Alan Dershowitz, among others.

Shalom Weiss: Weiss was pardoned 18 years into an 835-year sentence — believed to be the longest-ever white-collar prison sentence — for his role in setting up an insurance fraud scheme. He received support from Alan Dershowitz and Jay Sekulow, who sent letters to Trump.

Tom Leroy Whitehurst: The White House has said that Whitehurst was serving a life sentence in prison for leading a conspiracy to manufacture at least 16.7 kilograms of methamphetamine and possessing numerous firearms during the course of the conspiracy. His sentence has been commuted to 30 years, of which he’s served 24.

Caroline Yeats: The White House has said that Yeats’s 20-year sentence has been commuted. She has served almost 7 years of it and is a first-time, non-violent drug offender.

Chris Young: Young was pardoned for his non-violent drug offense in a conspiracy case and had served over 10 years of the sentence. He has initially been given a life sentence. Kim Kardashian West had been advocating for his release.

Robert “Bob” Zangrillo: Robert Zangrillo was pardoned for his role in the 2019 college admissions scandal. Zangrillo, the CEO of a private investment firm in Miami, FL, was accused of bribing employees from the University of Southern California’s athletics department to secure his daughter’s college place. He was charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

Here is the full list, as provided by the White House:

Abel Holtz — President Trump granted a full pardon to Abel Holtz. This pardon is supported by Representative Mario Diaz-Balart and friends and business colleagues in his community. Mr. Holtz is currently 86 years old. In 1995, he pled guilty to one count of impeding a grand jury investigation and was sentenced to 45 days in prison. Before his conviction, Mr. Holtz, who was the Chairman of a local bank, never had any legal issues and has had no other legal issues since his conviction. Mr. Holtz has devoted extensive time and resources to supporting charitable causes in South Florida, including substantial donations to the City of Miami Beach.

Jaime A. Davidson — President Trump commuted the sentence of Jaime A. Davidson. This commutation is supported by Mr. Davidson’s family and friends, Alice Johnson, and numerous others. In 1993, Mr. Davidson was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment in relation to the murder of an undercover officer. Notably, witnesses who testified against Mr. Davidson later recanted their testimony in sworn affidavits and further attested that Mr. Davidson had no involvement. Although Mr. Davidson has been incarcerated for nearly 29 years, the admitted shooter has already been released from prison. Following the commutation of his sentence, Mr. Davidson will continue legal efforts to clear his name. In addition, while incarcerated, Mr. Davidson mentored and tutored over 1,000 prisoners to help them achieve their GED certificates. Mr. Davidson has earned praise from prison officials for his dedication to helping others.

James E. Johnson, Jr. — President Trump granted a full pardon to James E. Johnson, Jr. In 2008, Mr. Johnson pled guilty to charges related to migratory birds. Mr. Johnson received 1 year probation, was barred from hunting during that period, and a $7,500 fine was imposed. Throughout his life, Mr. Johnson has made numerous contributions for the conservation of wildlife.

Tommaso Buti — President Trump granted a full pardon to Tommaso Buti. Mr. Buti is an Italian citizen and a respected businessman. He is the Chief Operating Officer of a large Italian company and has started a successful charitable initiative to raise funds for UNICEF. More than 20 years ago, Mr. Buti was charged with financial fraud involving a chain of restaurants. He has not, however, been convicted in the United States.

Jawad A. Musa — President Trump commuted the sentence of Jawad A. Musa. In 1991, Mr. Musa was sentence to life imprisonment for a non-violent, drug-related offense. Mr. Musa’s sentencing judge and the prosecutor on the case have both requested clemency on his behalf. He is currently 56-years old. During his time in prison, Mr. Musa has strengthened his faith and taken dozens of educational courses. Mr. Musa is blessed with a strong supportive network in Baltimore, Maryland and has numerous offers of employment.

Adriana Shayota — President Trump commuted the sentence of Adriana Shayota. Ms. Shayota has served more than half of her 24 month sentence. The Deputy Mayor of Chula Vista, California, John McCann, supports this commutation, among other community leaders. Ms. Shayota is a mother and a deeply religious woman who had no prior convictions. She was convicted of conspiracy to traffic in counterfeit goods, commit copyright infringement, and introduce misbranded food into interstate commerce. During her time in prison, Ms. Shayota mentored those who wanted to improve their lives and demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to rehabilitation.

Glen Moss — President Trump granted a full pardon to Glen Moss. After pleading guilty in 1998, Mr. Moss has been a vital member of his community. Mr. Moss has been committed to numerous philanthropic efforts at the national level, including St Jude’s Hospital for Children, Breast Cancer Awareness, and the Colon Cancer Foundation. Within his community, he has contributed to Danbury Hospital and Ann’s Place, a community-based cancer support center.

Michael Liberty — President Trump granted a full pardon to Michael Liberty. Mr. Liberty’s request for clemency is supported by Representative Susan Austin, Matthew E. Sturgis, and Anthony Fratianne. In 2016 Mr. Liberty was convicted for campaign finance violations and later was indicted for related offenses. Mr. Liberty is the father of 7 children and has been involved in numerous philanthropic efforts.

Greg Reyes — President Trump granted a full pardon to Greg Reyes. This pardon is supported by Shon Hopwood, former United States Attorney Brett Tolman, and numerous others. Mr. Reyes was the former CEO of Brocade Communications. Mr. Reyes was convicted of securities fraud. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, however, threw out his convictions, finding prosecutorial misconduct. He was later retried, convicted, and sentenced to 18 months in Federal prison. Mr. Reyes has accepted full responsibility for his actions and has been out of prison for more than 8 years.

Ferrell Damon Scott — President Trump commuted the sentence of Ferrell Damon Scott. This commutation is supported by former Acting United States Attorney Sam Sheldon, who prosecuted his case and wrote that he “… strongly does not believe that [Mr. Scott] deserves a mandatory life sentence.” Ms. Alice Johnson, the CAN-DO Foundation, and numerous others also support clemency for Mr. Scott. Mr. Scott has served nearly 9 years of a life imprisonment sentence for possession with intent to distribute marijuana. Under today’s sentencing guidelines, it is likely that Mr. Scott would not have received such a harsh sentence.

Jeffrey Alan Conway — President Trump granted a full pardon to Jeffrey Alan Conway. Mr. Conway’s pardon is strongly supported by his business partners Gary N. Solomon and Ely Hurwitz, members of law enforcement, and numerous other members of the community. Since his release from prison, Mr. Conway has led a successful life and currently runs 10 restaurant businesses that employ nearly 500 people. Mr. Conway is active in his community and in various philanthropic efforts.

Benedict Olberding — President Trump granted a full pardon to Benedict Olberding. Mr. Olberding was convicted on one count of bank fraud. Mr. Olberding is an upstanding member of the community who has paid his debt to society. After completing his sentence, he purchased two aquarium stores, as well as a consulting business to train prospective mortgage brokers.

Lou Hobbs — President Trump commuted the sentence of Lou Hobbs. Mr. Hobbs has served 24 years of his life sentence. While incarcerated, Mr. Hobbs completed his GED as well as various other education classes. Mr. Hobbs is dedicated to improving his life and is focused on his family and friends who have assisted him during difficult times.

Matthew Antoine Canady — President Trump commuted the sentence of Matthew Antoine Canady. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Canady had an unstable childhood and all of his prior drug-related convictions occurred during his teenage years. Mr. Canady worked hard to move beyond his challenging circumstances and has demonstrated extraordinary rehabilitation while in custody. He has maintained clear conduct while incarcerated and has notably taken advantage of significant vocational programs, including an electrical apprenticeship. He receives “outstanding” work reports and is described as “hardworking” and “respectful” by the Bureau of Prisons staff. Mr. Canady takes full responsibility for his criminal actions and would like to find gainful employment to help support his children.

Mario Claiborne — President Trump commuted the sentence of Mario Claiborne. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Claiborne is serving life imprisonment and has already served more than 28 years in prison. For more than 20 years, Mr. Claiborne has maintained clear conduct. Mr. Claiborne currently works for a UNICOR facility and has completed rehabilitative programming, including drug education.

Luis Fernando Sicard — President Trump commuted the sentence of Luis Fernando Sicard. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Sicard was sentenced in 2000 for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession of a firearm during and in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. He has served 20 years with clear conduct. Mr. Sicard has participated in substantial programming, including a number of vocational courses. Currently, Mr. Sicard works in the camp vehicular factory and previously worked in UNICOR earning “outstanding” work reports, and he also volunteers in the inmate puppy program. Importantly, Mr. Sicard takes full responsibility for his criminal actions. Mr. Sicard is a former Marine and father of two girls.

DeWayne Phelps — President Trump commuted the sentence of DeWayne Phelps. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Phelps has served 11 years in prison for conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. He has served over a decade in prison with clear conduct, has trained as a dental apprentice, participated in UNICOR, and is noted as being a reliable inmate capable of being assigned additional responsibilities. Most notably, Mr. Phelps’s sentence would unquestionably be lower today under the First Step Act.

Isaac Nelson — President Trump commuted the sentence of Isaac Nelson. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Nelson is serving a mandatory 20 year sentence for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of 5 kilograms or more of cocaine and 50 grams or more of crack cocaine. Following the First Step Act’s changes to the definition of serious drug felony, Mr. Nelson would no longer receive a mandatory minimum term of 20 years’ imprisonment. Instead, he would likely face a 10-year sentence. He has already served more than 11 years in prison. Throughout his incarceration, he appears to have demonstrated commendable adjustment to custody.

Traie Tavares Kelly — President Trump commuted the sentence of Traie Tavares Kelly. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Kelly was convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base and 5 kilograms or more of cocaine. He has served over 14 years in prison, but if he were sentenced today, he would likely be subject only to 10-year mandatory minimum. Moreover, Mr. Kelly has substantial work history while incarcerated and his notable accomplishments in education and programming demonstrate that he has used his time to maximize his chance at being a productive citizen upon release.

Javier Gonzales — President Trump commuted the sentence of Javier Gonzales. This commutation is supported by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Gonzales was convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and distribution of methamphetamine in 2005. He has served over 14 years in prison, which is 4 years longer than the 10-year sentence he would likely receive today. He has a demonstrated record of rehabilitation during his incarceration, including steady employment, with substantial UNCIOR experience, and participation in vocational programming and training to facilitate his successful reintegration into the workforce upon release. He also has no history of violent conduct. Mr. Gonzales has actively addressed his admitted substance abuse issues with nonresidential drug treatment and participation in the residential program.

Eric Wesley Patton — President Trump granted a full pardon to Eric Wesley Patton. This pardon is supported by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Patton was convicted of making a false statement on a mortgage application in 1999. In the 20 years since his conviction, Mr. Patton has worked hard to build a sterling reputation, been a devoted parent, and made solid contributions to his community by quietly performing good deeds for friends, neighbors, and members of his church.

Robert William Cawthon — President Trump granted a full pardon to Robert William Cawthon. His pardon is supported by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Cawthon was convicted in 1992 for making a false statement on a bank loan application and was sentenced to 3 years’ probation, conditioned upon 180 days’ home confinement. Mr. Cawthon has accepted responsibility for his offense, served his sentence without incident, and fulfilled his restitution obligation. His atonement has been exceptional, and since his conviction he has led an unblemished life while engaging in extensive, praiseworthy community service.

Hal Knudson Mergler — President Trump granted a full pardon to Hal Knudson Mergler. This pardon is supported by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the Office of the Pardon Attorney. Mr. Mergler was convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in 1992. He received 1 month imprisonment, 3 years supervised release, and ordered to pay restitution. Since his conviction, Mr. Mergler has lived a productive and law-abiding life, including by earning a college degree, creating a successful business career, and starting a family. He has made significant contributions to his community and has helped to build a new school for a non-profit charitable organization. He is uniformly praised as a hardworking and ethical businessman and a caring father.

Other Political pardons and commutations since Trump has been in office…

Joseph M. Arpaio – for Contempt of court

Kristian Mark Saucier – Unauthorized retention of defense information

Scooter Lewis Libby – Obstruction of justice; false statements; perjury (two counts)

Jack Johnson – Violation of the White Slave Traffic Act

Dinesh D’Souza – Campaign contribution fraud

Dwight Lincoln Hammond – Use of fire to damage and destroy property of the United States (two counts)

Michael Chase Behenna – Unpremeditated murder; assault

Patrick James Nolan – Conducting the affairs of an enterprise through a pattern of racketeering

Conrad Moffat Black – Mail fraud; attempted obstruction of justice

Michael Anthony Tedesco – Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute in excess of 5 kilograms of cocaine and quantities of marijuana

Roy Wayne McKeever – Used telephone in distributing marijuana

John Richard Bubala – Conversion of government property

Chalmer Lee Williams – Conspiracy to steal firearms and other goods as part of an interstate shipment; theft from shipment in interstate commerce; theft of firearms shipped in interstate commerce.

Rodney M. Takumi – Participating in an illegal gambling business.

Zay Jeffries – Conspiracy to violate the Sherman Act.

Mathew Golsteyn – Premeditated murder (charged, not tried or convicted)

Clint A. Lorance – Attempted murder; murder (two specifications); wrongfully communicating a threat (two specifications); reckless endangerment; solicitating a false statement; obstructing justice.

Angela Ronae Stanton – Conspiracy to transport in interstate commerce a stolen motor vehicle and tampering with a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN).

Ariel Manuel Friedler – Conspiracy to access a protected computer without authorization.

David Hossein Safavian – Obstruction; false statement (three counts).

Michael Robert Milken – Conspiracy; securities fraud; mail fraud; tax fraud; filing false reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); assisting a brokerage firm in violating its net capital requirements.

Paul Harvey Pogue – Making and subscribing a false tax return.

Bernard Bailey Kerik – Obstructing the administration of the Internal Revenue Laws; aiding in the preparation of a false income tax return; making false statements on a loan application; making false statements (five counts).

Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. – Misprision of a felony.

Susan B. Anthony – (June 18, 1873) Illegal voting

Jon Donyae Ponder – Bank robbery; interference with commerce by armed robbery (six counts.

Alice Marie Johnson – Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; attempted possession of 12 kilos of cocaine with intent to distribute; attempted possession of 9 kilos of cocaine; attempted possession of 75 kilos of cocaine; attempted possession of 10 kilos of cocaine; conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering ($1.5 million); structuring monetary transactions.

Michael T. Flynn – Making false statements to Federal investigators.

Phillip Kay Lyman – Conspiracy to operate off-road vehicles on public land closed to off-road vehicles; operation of off-road vehicle on public lands closed to off-road vehicles.

Otis Gordon – Sell, distribute, or dispense a controlled substance.

Weldon Hal Angelos – Possession with intent to distribute marijuana (five counts); possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime (three counts); possession of a stolen firearm (two counts); possession of a firearm with a removed serial number; use of a controlled substance in possession of a firearm (two counts); money laundering (three counts).

Alex Van Der Zwaan – False statements.

George Papadopoulos – False statements

Christopher Carl Collins – Conspiracy to commit securities fraud; false statements

Duncan D. Hunter – Conspiracy to commit offenses.

Alfonso Antonio Costa – Health care fraud.

Paul Alvin Slough – Voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (13 counts); attempt to commit voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (17 counts); using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence and aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done.

Nicholas Abram Slatten – Murder in the first degree.

Evan Shawn Liberty – Voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (eight counts); attempt to commit voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (12 counts); using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence and aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done.

Dustin Laurent Heard – Voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (six counts); attempt to commit voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (11 counts); using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence and aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done.

Jose Alonso Compean – Assault with a dangerous weapon, and aiding and abetting; assault with serious bodily injury, and aiding and abetting; discharge of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence; deprivation of rights under color of law.

Alfred Lee Crum – Illegally operating a still; unlawful possession of a still; operating without bond.

Ignacio Ramos – Assault with a dangerous weapon and aiding and abetting; assault with serious bodily injury and aiding and abetting; discharge of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence; deprivation of rights under color of law.

Roger Joseph Stone Jr. – Obstruction of proceeding; false statements (five counts); witness tampering.

Paul J. Manafort – Subscribing to false United States individual income tax returns for 2010-2014 tax years (five counts); failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts for calendar years 2011-2014; bank fraud/Lender B/$3.4 million loan; bank fraud/Lender C/$1 million loan. Conspiracy against the United States; conspiracy to obstruct justice (witness tampering)

Margaret E. Hunter – Conspiracy to commit offenses

Charles Kushner – Fraud and false statements (16 counts); retaliating against witness, victim; statements or entries generally.

William Plemons – Structuring transactions to avoid reporting requirements (four counts. Willfully attempting to evade personal

income tax (three counts). Wire fraud.

Topeka Kimberly Sam – Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride.

Peter Y. Atkinson – Mail fraud (three counts).

John A. Boultbee – Mail fraud.

Andrew Barron Worden – Mail fraud.

Mary Ballard McCarty – Conspiracy to commit honest services fraud.

James J. Kassouf – Making a false tax return.

John Frederick Tate – Conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States; causing false records; causing false campaign contribution reports; false statements scheme.

Jesse R. Benton – Conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States; causing false records; causing false campaign contribution reports; false statements scheme.

Christopher II X – Conspiracy to distribute cocaine. 4 other occuring cocaine violations.

Cesar Agusto Lozada – Conspiracy to distribute marijuana.

Rickey Ivan Kanter – Mail fraud

Stephanie Christine Mohr – Deprivation of rights under color of law

Robert Edward Coughlin II – Conflict of interest

Mark Siljander – Obstruction of justice; violation of Foreign Agents Registration Act

James Harutun Batmasian – Willful failure to pay over tax

Gary Mark Brugman – Deprivation of rights under color of law

Joseph Occhipinti – Conspiracy to violate civil rights; deprivation of rights under color of law (10 misdemeanor counts); false statements (six counts)

Rebekah Kay Charleston – Conspiracy to commit tax evasion

Russell Paul Plaisance – Conspiracy to unlawfully import cocaine into the U.S.

 

 

 

 

 

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